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Join KPCC's AirTalk with host Larry Mantle weekdays for lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, the arts, entertainment, and more. Call-in number: 866-893-5722
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    Violent Clashes Erupt at "Unite The Right" Rally In Charlottesville

    Members of the Virginia National Guard wear body armor and carry riot shields while standing guard on the pedestrian mall following violence at the United the Right rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia.; Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Northern California is bracing itself for a slew of rallies being planned on upcoming weekends that are shedding light on how much latitude cities have to take precautions against protests to prevent violence while not running afoul of the First Amendment and the tactics police use to find the right balance between keeping the peace and enforcing the law.

    This weekend, protesters will gather and march on Google headquarters in nine cities, including on the company’s main campus in Mountain View, CA and in Venice here in Southern California. The supporters released their code of conduct for the so-called ‘March on Google’ following the weekend violence in Charlottesville, which condemns “violence, hatred and bigotry and all groups that espouse it, such as White Nationalists, KKK, Antifa and NeoNazis.” Organizers have distanced themselves from the so-called ‘alt-right,’ saying they are marching in support of the First Amendment and James Damore, the Google engineer whose now-infamous manifesto arguing against diversity in the workplace went viral and led to his firing.

    The weekend after that, protesters with a group called ‘Patriot Prayer’ have permit to gather at Crissy Field in San Francisco. After a man plowed his car into a crowd of people during last weekend’s unrest in Charlottesville, some local officials are concerned about keeping the peace, especially if things between group members and counter-protesters get heated. Berkeley is also preparing for a rally on August 27th for a group called ‘No Marxism in America.’

    How far can cities go in terms of measures to prevent violence at protests without infringing on free speech rights? What kinds of tactics do police officers employ in preparation for the rallies and during them?

    Guests:

    Eugene Volokh, professor of law at UCLA

    Bill Lansdowne, former chief of the San Diego Police Department, retired in 2014; he’s also been a police chief in San Jose and Richmond

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Anti-Donald Trump protesters demonstrate on Inauguration Day, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.; Credit: Courtesy of Jonas Anderson

    AirTalk®

    A tech firm based in Los Angeles is fighting back against the U.S. Department of Justice, which has demanded it turn over more than 1.3 million IP addresses for people who visited a website that was used to organize anti-Trump protests during his inauguration.

    Dreamhost, a company that hosts websites and sells domain names, made the DOJ request public on Monday, saying that it was vast overreach on the part of the feds. In addition to the IP addresses of people who visited, Dreamhost says the request also asks for emails between organizers and interested parties, any deleted files, and even subscriber information. There are also concerns about a potential violation of First Amendment free speech rights if fear of the government having private information about their identity would stop people from visiting the website.

    Prosecutors for the feds have argued in court that the DOJ request is completely within the confines of the constitution. that the website was used to help organize a violent riot, referencing protests on Inauguration Day in January that led to property damage and six cops being injured, and that Dreamhost’s “it’s too broad” reasoning was not sufficient to reject the DOJ request.

    Do you think the DOJ is within its rights to request this information or do you see it as an overreach? What, if any, free speech or privacy issues do you see arising?

    We reached out to DreamHost, which declined to join us for an interview.

    Guests:

    Alan Butler, senior counsel for the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)

    Orin Kerr, professor of law at the George Washington University; he’ll be a professor at USC’s Gould School of Law in January

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    US-CANADA-MEXICO-TRADE

    Members of the delgations assemble before the start of the negotiations for the modernization of NAFTA, August 16, 2016, between the US, Canada and Mexico, in Washington, DC.; Credit: PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Ambassadors from Canada and Mexico are in Washington D.C. to begin talks with the U.S. about renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

    President Trump has called it an awful deal for the U.S. and talked about throwing it out altogether at one point, but has since dialed back his rhetoric and called for the agreement to be reshaped.

    We’ll talk with reporters based in each of the three involved countries about what each is looking for, areas where there is room for compromise (or not) and how each country’s wishlist jives with the others.

    Guests:

    Megan Cassella, trade reporter for POLITICO; she tweets @mmcassella

    Kate Linthicum, L.A. Times correspondent based in Mexico City; she tweets @katelinthicum

    Theo Argitis, Ottawa Bureau Chief for Bloomberg News; he tweets @theoargitis

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Violent Clashes Erupt at "Unite The Right" Rally In Charlottesville

    Hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" march down East Market Street toward Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia.; Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    In the aftermath of the Charlottesville monument protests, many white nationalists who participated in the rallies are getting some unwanted attention.

    As reported by TechCrunch, the Twitter user @YesYoureRacist has a mission to identify protesters online, what’s commonly known as doxxing. That led to the firing of Cole White, who worked at a Berkeley hot dog restaurant, Top Dog. The employer put a statement on the restaurant’s door, saying that White’s actions were not supported by the business.

    Sign on the door of Top Dog on Durant Ave confirms Cole White is no longer employed by the chain pic.twitter.com/ROwAed2NOl

    — Harini Shyamsundar (@hshyamsundar) August 13, 2017

    NY Daily News writer Shaun King also took to Twitter to identify white nationalist rally participants named as suspects in the assault of a counter protester. And there have been some misidentification issues with doxxing on social media. @YoureARacist issued an apology after falsely accusing YouTube personality Joey Salads of wearing a Nazi armband. So what are the ethics of doxing on Twitter and other social media platforms?

    Guest:

    Josh Constine, editor-at-large for TechCrunch; he tweets @JoshConstine 

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Confederate Monuments Taken Down In Baltimore

    The pedestal where a statue dedicated to Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stood is shown August 16, 2017 in Baltimore, Maryland. ; Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    On Tuesday, Trump told reporters that the “alt-left” bears some responsibility for the violence at the white nationalist protest in Charlottesville, Virginia. But what, exactly, is the “alt-left?”

    In the Atlantic’s September cover story, “The Rise of the Violent Left,” Peter Beinart traces the history of Antifa – antifascists or Anti-Fascist Action – from its roots in the militant left fighting European fascism in the 1920s to its reactionary revival due to Neo-Nazi movements in the 70s and 80s, to today’s revival of Antifa in response to the rise in white nationalism in America.

    Beinart writes that Antifa is a disparate movement, but many of its subscribers are anarchists and the unifying ethos has to do with circumventing policy in favor of direct action, such as destroying corporate property, doxing Neo-Nazis and breaking up white nationalist gatherings, by violence, if necessary.

    Where did Antifa come from? What is it today? And is it fair to equate it, as President Trump did Tuesday, to the alt-right?

    Guest:

    Peter Beinart, contributing editor for The Atlantic where his recent story is “The Rise of the Violent Left;” he is also the senior columnist for Forward.com and an Associate Professor of Journalism and political science at the City University of New York; he tweets @PeterBeinart 

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Vigils Held Across For Country For Victims Of Violence At White Nationalist Rally In Charlottesville, Virginia

    A protestor, who was marching on 5th Avenue against white supremacy and racism, is arrested by New York City Police (NYPD) officers, August 13, 2017 in New York City. ; Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    The events of the last week – the violence during a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville this weekend, the far-right planning rallies across the U.S. and the spotlight swiveling to Antifa, the militant left, which advocates fighting fascism with violence – are bubbling over into a larger conversation about the scope of the First Amendment.

    Here it is, in full:

    AMENDMENT 1.

    "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

    The militant left, or Antifa, advocates the use of direct action, such as breaking up white nationalist rallies and violence, if necessary. In their view, white nationalist hate speech incites violence, which validates a violent response. But hate speech is protected under the First Amendment, just like any other speech.

    So what are the legal limits of protesting hate speech? Is violence ever justifiable and in what situations? What are the strategic and legal approaches to fighting movements that protesters view as morally reprehensible?

    Guests:

    Jody Armour, professor of Law at the University of Southern California

    Eugene Volokh, professor of law at UCLA

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    President Trump Speaks On Infrastructure Meeting Held At Trump Tower

    US President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower, August 15, 2017 in New York City.; Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    President Donald Trump took to the podium at Trump Tower Tuesday for an infrastructure presser that quickly took a turn into a heated back and forth on his Charlottesville comments.

    Trump, who appeared to have prepared statements from his Saturday statement on Charlotteville close at hand for the conference, decided to go off-script instead and open the floor for questions. As reported by the Los Angeles Times, reporters asked questions about the president’s remarks on the Charlottesville protests, in which he failed to condemn white nationalists at Saturday’s rally.

    Trump reiterated his initial statement about the incident, where he placed blame for the violence “on many sides,” and went on to say that counter protesters against the white nationalists in Charlottesville were also at fault. He went on to say that not all protesters of removing the General Robert E. Lee statue at the rally were white supremacists, and asked if historical connections to George Washington and Thomas Jefferson should be erased because they were slave owners. The president also condemned the white nationalist who was charged with driving his car into a group of counter-protesters, which killed one woman.

    So what is the fallout from Trump’s press conference? Will his base be supportive of his statements about Charlottesville? And how are Republicans and Democrats reacting?

    Guests:

    Noah Bierman, White House reporter for the Los Angeles Times; he’s been following the story; he tweets @Noahbierman

    Charles Kesler, professor of government at Claremont McKenna College and editor of the Claremont Review of Books

    Sean T. Walsh, Republican political analyst and partner at Wilson Walsh Consulting in San Francisco; he is a former adviser to California Governors Pete Wilson and Arnold Schwarzenegger and a former White House staffer for Presidents Reagan and H.W. Bush

    Matt Rodriguez, Democratic strategist and founder and chief executive officer of Rodriguez Strategies; he is also a former senior Obama advisor in 2008; he tweets @RodStrategies

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    AirTalk host Larry Mantle at Across the Divide 2.; Credit: Bill Youngblood

    AirTalk®

    In December, AirTalk convened a group of Southern Californians – four supporters of Donald Trump, four supporters of Hillary Clinton– to share their hopes, expectations and concerns before the start of the Trump presidency.

    Seven months in, we bring them back together for a check-in.

    30 minutes til second edition of @KPCC@Airtalk#acrossthedivide . Tune in: 89.3FM or https://t.co/Ga2cYSSlHNpic.twitter.com/COFGKShbAR

    — AirTalk (@AirTalk) August 17, 2017

    @kpcc's @airtalk is reaching #acrossthedivide to Clinton/Trump supporters on life after the election. Listen today at 10:30am PST pic.twitter.com/HG0g66mq4T

    — AirTalk (@AirTalk) August 17, 2017

    7 months in, @KPCC@Airtalk brings back our #acrossthedivide panel of Southern Californians to talk Trump presidency. Starts at 10:30am pic.twitter.com/FCwq5uOt1x

    — AirTalk (@AirTalk) August 17, 2017

    Tune in at 10:30am for @KPCC@AirTalk#acrossthedivide town hall. 8 Southern Californians regroup to talk Trump, immigration, media, more. pic.twitter.com/ei9lnlS7tr

    — AirTalk (@AirTalk) August 17, 2017

    In Dec, @AirTalk recorded our first #acrossthedivide (https://t.co/FmBrXPXf48). Today, we broadcast our follow-up. Tune in at 10:30am pic.twitter.com/KiKBC0haZB

    — AirTalk (@AirTalk) August 17, 2017

     

    Guests:

    Trump supporters:

    Ben Clymer, chief financial officer of the Body Shop & Collision Centers of Southern California; he lives in Riverside

    Terrance Lang, a marketing executive who lives in Westchester

    Mark Ma, a Chinese immigrant in the IT field who lives in Pomona

    Francisco Rivera, a janitorial worker who lives in Huntington Park  

    Clinton supporters:

    Anabel Krishnann, a project manager in the tech industry who lives in Culver City

    Eugene Hung, an Evangelical Christian in the website content development field who lives in Fullerton

    Faisal Qazi, a neurologist who lives in Fullerton

    Mia Shackelford, a business consultant in San Francisco and recent college graduate from Scripps College in Claremont

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Violent Clashes Erupt at "Unite The Right" Rally In Charlottesville

    Protesters use their banners to block the view of victims injured when a car plowed through a crowd of demonstrators marching through the downtown shopping district August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia.; Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    After statement saying white supremacist violence isn’t free speech, are CA ACLU branches breaking rank?

    The American Civil Liberties Union has been in the spotlight since the beginning of the Trump administration as the major legal organization pushing back against some of its more controversial policies, like the president’s travel ban. But their recent defense of white supremacists who marched in Charlottesville, Virginia has many questioning their long-standing philosophy of advocating for First Amendment rights, even for hate groups.

    On Thursday, three branches of the ACLU of California released a joint statement saying that while they support freedom of speech, “the First Amendment does not protect people who incite or engage in violence.” Though it does not say so in as many words, some are viewing this as the California branches breaking step with the national branch. Others found the statement strange, saying that it’s obvious that violence isn’t speech and that assembly must be allowed regardless of the potential for violence or incitement.

    #Breaking A statement from @ACLU_SoCal, @ACLU_NorCal& @sdACLU: White Supremacist Violence is not Free Speech https://t.co/qsI9q8wwx2pic.twitter.com/D0m3f4SDZY

    — ACLU SoCal (@ACLU_SoCal) August 16, 2017

     

    What do you think of the California ACLU branches’ statement? What about the national branch’s decision to go to court for the right of the white supremacists to protest? As a major legal organization that has helped shape much of modern First Amendment application, what is its role in this situation?

    We reached out to the three ACLU California branches who issued the joint statement. The ACLU of Southern California was not available for the show today. We also reached out to the national branch of the ACLU, which did not respond in time for the airing of our segment but did send us this statement from ACLU executive director Anthony D. Romero:

    “We agree with every word in the statement from our colleagues in California. The First Amendment absolutely does not protect white supremacists seeking to incite or engage in violence. We condemn the views of white supremacists, and fight against them every day. At the same time, we believe that even odious hate speech, with which we vehemently disagree, garners the protection of the First Amendment when expressed non-violently. We make decisions on whom we'll represent and in what context on a case-by-case basis. The horrible events in Charlottesville last weekend will certainly inform those decisions going forward.”

    Guest:

    Eugene Volokh, professor of law at UCLA

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Cyber Security Concerns In The Global Wake of Hacking Threat

    In this photo illustration, The Google logo is projected onto a man on August 09, 2017 in London, England.; Credit: Leon Neal/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    In the days since the violence in Charlottesville, major tech companies across the spectrum have been wading into the national discussion about how far free speech protections go when it comes to the kinds of hate speech that white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups use to promote their beliefs.

    Monday, Domain name registrar GoDaddy de-listed the popular neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer. Google did the same after backlash when the site switched its registration there.

    All of this raises the issue of whether, and if so how much, tech companies like Google, Facebook and GoDaddy should be policing the content on their sites. Some say it’s about time the companies start taking responsibility for offensive things that use their infrastructure as a platform to spread their message. Others worry about a slippery slope situation regarding free speech, and that the censorship could go too far.

    Do you think these tech giants should be the gatekeepers in deciding what is offensive and what isn’t for their sites, or do you worry about the potential for going too far and running afoul of the First Amendment?

    Guests:

    Elizabeth Dwoskin, Silicon Valley correspondent for the Washington Post

    Matthew Prince, CEO and co-founder of Cloudflare, a SF-based company that provides content delivery, internet security services and domain name server services; it recently announced it would stop servicing the neo-Nazi website ‘Daily Stormer’

    Barry McDonald, professor of law at Pepperdine University

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    A Minute's Silence Is Held In Barcelona To Pay Tribute To The Terror Attack Victims

    People clap after walking along Las Ramblas after a minute's silence following yesterday's terrorist attack, on August 18, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain. ; Credit: Carl Court/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    The Catalonian cities of Barcelona and Cambrils in Spain were targets of two new attacks where vehicles plowed into a crowded area.

    As reported by the BBC, a white van zig-zagged through Barcelona’s famous Las Ramblas district Thursday afternoon, hitting as many pedestrians as possible before fleeing the scene. The suspect is still at-large and has been identified as 17-year-old Moussa Oukabir. Oukabir is believed by law enforcement to have used his older brother’s documents to rent the van that plowed through the crowd. Spanish police have described the incident as a terrorist attack, leaving 13 dead and more than 100 injured.

    In a related attack early the next morning, an Audi A3 was driven through a crowd of pedestrians, this time in Cambrils, a resort town 68 miles south-west of Barcelona. The car overturned and five people emerged, some wearing fake suicide belts. They were shot and killed by police. A woman who was hurt in the attack died later at the hospital. Five other people were injured, one of whom is a police officer. Victims of the attack included an American whose name has not yet been released, and there were at least 34 nationalities representing people who were either killed or injured during the two incidents.

    ISIS has no evidence that it was behind what happened in Las Ramblas, but claimed it was behind the attack. Earlier today, a stabbing spree in Turku, Finland was also reported. Details are still emerging. According to CNN, at least one person was killed and seven others were hospitalized.

    To find out more, Larry speaks to a reporter who is on the scene in Barcelona.

    Guests:

    Bahman Kalbasi, correspondent for the BBC reporting from Barcelona; he tweets @BahmanKalbasi

    Brian Michael Jenkins, senior advisor to the president of the Rand Corporation and one of the nation's leading experts on terrorism and homeland security; he tweets @BrianMJenkins

    Breaking news: Steve Bannon out at White House

    Marc Fisher, senior editor for the Washington Post

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    Proper eye protection is a must for anyone looking up at a solar eclipse. Eclipse glasses are far darker than regular sunglasses.

    Proper eye protection is a must for anyone looking up at a solar eclipse; eclipse glasses are far darker than regular sunglasses.; Credit: Joseph Okpako/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Over the next seventy-two hours, Angelenos will travel all over the country to cities and states in the once-in-a-lifetime solar eclipse’s path of totality. 

    We’ll speak with them live on Monday as the eclipse peaks here in southern California. In the meantime, we talk with science writer John Dvorak, who has been following the eclipse's path for the last week, about what how people are preparing and what to expect from what is said to be a life-changing event. 

    Guest: 

    John Dvorak, a tech writer and author of numerous books, including his latest, “Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses” (Pegasus Books, 2017) 

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    TOPSHOT-INDONESIA-ASTRONOMY-ECLIPSE

    This photo combo shows the moon passing in front of the sun (top L to bottom R) during a total solar eclipse in the city of Ternate, in Indonesia's Maluku Islands, on March 9, 2016.; Credit: BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Nearly a century has passed since North America witnessed a total solar eclipse.

    Not sure exactly how to define an eclipse? An eclipse, which lasts a handful of minutes, occurs when the sun, Earth and moon move in alignment with each other, according to NASA. In fact, that kind of rare celestial occurrence from coast to coast hasn’t been seen in the continental U.S. since 1918. But in California, the moon is expected to block around 70 percent during peak eclipse.

    A total solar eclipse, where the moon will completely obscure the sun, will occur across a 70-mile-wide path across 14 states from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. In this path of totality, the sun’s corona will be visible to viewers.

    Whether you’re an eclipse chaser or eclipse newbie, it’s worth noting to avoid looking directly at the sun unless you’re wearing solar eclipse glasses. And take a cue from Popular Science’s guide to photographing an eclipse. The next solar eclipse is scheduled to take place in 2024 and 2045.

    Comment below to share your experience of watching the solar eclipse of the century.

    Guests:

    Sanden Totten, host of “Brains On!,” a science podcast for kids, and a science writer for “Bill Nye Saves The World," which airs on Netflix

    Leo Duran, KPCC reporter and producer and Take Two, who is at the Griffith Observatory

    Mike Roe, digital news producer for KPCC; he and his family are traveling to to the “Solar Port” at the Madras Municipal Airport Madras in Oregon

    John Horn, host of KPCC's The Frame; he and his family are in Madras, Oregon

    Alex Cohen, KPCC's Morning Edition host, who is at Kidspace Children's Museum in Pasadena

    Alisha Roemeling, K-12 education reporter at The Register-Guard, a daily newspaper for Eugene, Springfield and Lane County, Oregon; she’s been following the story and tweets @alisharoemeling

    Angelica Carpenter, community news and sports reporter for the Blue Mountain Eagle, a weekly newspaper covering Grant County in Eastern Oregon; she’s been following the story

    Rylan Boggs, reporter for the Blue Mountain Eagle, a weekly newspaper covering Grant County in Eastern Oregon; he tweets @RT_Boggs

     

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    SiriusXM Town Hall With Jerry Lewis Hosted By Maria Menounos

    Comedian Jerry Lewis participates in the SiriusXM Town Hall at The Friars Club on June 4, 2014 in New York City.; Credit: Andrew Toth/Getty Images for SiriusXM

    AirTalk®

    Comedy legend Jerry Lewis, 91, died in his Las Vegas home on Sunday from natural causes, according to his publicist.

    As reported by the Associated Press, Lewis suffered from lung disease pulmonary fibrosis, back problems and had a pain killer addiction. He was best known for his outlandish slapstick comedy and annual muscular dystrophy telethons. For those not familiar with his loud, physical comedic style, he is referenced as being an influence on Jim Carrey.

    Lewis began his career at age five, performing in his parents’ vaudeville act. He went on as part of a duo with Dean Martin, which gave Lewis international fame and put his mark on radio, theater, television and film.

    His most notable films include “The Bellboy” and “The Nutty Professor.” The French famously loved Lewis’ comedy, and he was awarded the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor in 1983 by the French government. Throughout his career, it was also reported that Lewis was so into his work that he would sometimes forget to eat. Even at 90, the comedian said he still woke up at 4:30 or 5am to work on his writing.

    But as acclaimed as Lewis was, there were those who felt his comedy was more obnoxious than funny. Larry looks back with a former film critic, to talk about Lewis' life, work and the polarizing feelings behind his comedy.

    Guest:

    Shawn Levy, former film critic for The Oregonian (1997 to 2012) and author of “King of Comedy: The Life and Art of Jerry Lewis” (St. Martins Press, 1997); his latest book is “Dolce Vita Confidential: Fellini, Loren, Pucci, Paparazzi, and the Swinging High Life of 1950s Rome” (W.W. Norton & Company, 2016);  he tweets @shawnlevy

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


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    President Donald Trump Makes Statement On Paris Climate Agreement

    WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 01: Senior Counselor to the President Steve Bannon helps with last minute preparations before President Donald Trump announces his decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement at the White House June 1, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump pledged on the campaign trail to withdraw from the accord, which former President Barack Obama and the leaders of 194 other countries signed in 2015 to deal with greenhouse gas emissions mitigation, adaptation and finance so to limit global warming to a manageable level. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images); Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    As the Trump administration begins its first week without its chief strategist Steve Bannon, we ask what effect his removal has on White House policy and Breitbart News.

    Bannon, who shared the president’s nationalist tendencies, departed the White House last week after serving for seven months.

    His exit is the latest in a string of high-profile West Wing departures and controversies. It came amid deadly protests in Charlottesville, Virginia during which Trump equated white supremacists and neo-Nazis with left-wing protesters who stood against them.

    Trump said both sides were to blame for the violence in Charlottesville during a press conference intended to review his new infrastructure plan. On the show today, we’ll circle back to the shakeups in the federal permitting process for new bridges and highways.

    We’ll look into an article published in The Guardian on Monday about Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his efforts to bring back the tough policies in effect during the United States’ war on drugs. Trump is also expected to deliver a prime-time speech on Afghanistan and updates to the country’s military presence there Monday night.

    We have a preview of his anticipated remarks.

    Over the weekend, Trump also tweeted about Boston’s “free speech” rally.

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I want to applaud the many protestors in Boston who are speaking out against bigotry and hate. Our country will soon come together as one!</p>&mdash; Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/899008521726861312">August 19, 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    On Saturday, tens of thousands of counter protesters attempted to quell the Boston rally, which they feared would be attended by white-supremacist groups. In Laguna Beach, a regular monthly pro-Trump “America First!” vigil also attracted a sizable group of counter-protesters. We have details from both events.

    Guests:

    Charles Kesler, professor of government at Claremont McKenna College and editor of the Claremont Review of Books

    Caroline Heldman, associate professor of politics at Occidental College and author of the forthcoming book, “Protest Politics in the Marketplace: Consumer Activism in the Corporate Age” (Cornell University Press, 2017); she tweets @carolineheldman

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.