Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Join KPCC's AirTalk with host Larry Mantle weekdays for lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, the arts, entertainment, and more. Call-in number: 866-893-5722
    0 0

    Photo of a BIRD e-scooter.; Credit: BIRD/Instagram

    AirTalk®

    In case you haven’t heard, the latest public nuisance facing the city San Francisco takes the form of undocked motorized scooters.

    Three companies that make these e-bikes – including the Santa Monica-based Bird – were served cease and desist letters by San Francisco’s City Attorney for essentially creating a mess in the city.  

    Riders of these scooters use an app to pay for their use, and can park them anywhere when they are done. And that’s precisely one of the problems: annoyed San Franciscans say that these e-scooters are left everywhere, oftentimes blocking sidewalks and business entrances. Furthermore, users are accused of unlawfully riding on the sidewalks, sans helmets, sometimes going faster than the 15 miles per hour speed limit.

    San Francisco isn’t the only city where these e-scooters are rampant. These bikes are also popular in SoCal cities like Santa Monica.

    Guests:

    Kevin Truong, reporter and multimedia producer for the San Francisco Business Times who has been following the story

    David Estrada, chief legal officer and head of government relations at Bird, the Venice-based e-scooter company which has been served a cease and desist letter by the City Attorney of San Francisco

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Soldiers In Battle

    Soldiers fighting in the Battle of Bennington during the American War of Independence. ; Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    For Americans, the British accent can sound either sexy or snobby. To the British, Americans are ruining the English language. Why the love-hate relationship?

    One linguist has set out to unravel this sibling rivalry. Why the widespread British phobia of American words? How’d Americans even get from centre to center? And what keeps driving us further apart?

    Professor Lynne Murphy, a New York native who now resides in England, details her observations on the English language in her new book, “The Prodigal Tongue: The Love-Hate Relationship Between American and British English.” She’s used her longtime alter ego, Lynneguist, to blog about our intriguing separation by a common language.

    Murphy speaks with Larry Mantle about her most amusing and insightful findings. Call us to weigh in with your questions and comments at 866-893-5722.

    Guest:

    Lynne Murphy, linguistics professor at the University of Sussex in England and author of the book, “The Prodigal Tongue: The Love-Hate Relationship Between American and British English” (Penguin Random House, 2018); she is also author of the blog, “Separated by a Common Language”; she tweets @lynneguist

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Former FBI Director Robert Mueller arrives to testify before the House Judiciary Committee in 2013. The Justice Department announced Wednesday that Mueller will lead the FBI's investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 election.

    Special Counsel, and former FBI Director, Robert Mueller arrives before the House Judiciary Committee in 2013.; Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    On the surface, a Supreme Court case involving the Securities and Exchange Commission would likely only pique the interest of financial junkies and the most die-hard court-watchers.

    One such case currently before the high court appears to deal with stock fraud, but could expand into answering a question that’s been permeating through the country: does President Trump have the authority to fire White House special counsel Robert Mueller?

    Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission looks at whether SEC administrative law judges (ALJs), who function as hearing officers within the SEC and other government agencies when a person or company is accused of violating antifraud laws, are “officers” and therefore subject to firing by the president, or are simply “employees,” which would prevent the president from firing them.

    So, where do President Trump and Bob Mueller fit into all this? Lawyers for the Trump administration say that Mueller falls under the appointments clause’s definition of an “officer,” and President Trump has the authority to fire Mueller if he wants to do so. Others argue that Mueller was appointed on rules stating he can only be removed for “misconduct, dereliction of duty, incapacity, conflict of interest, or for other good cause,” therefore only deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein would have the power to fire him.

    So which is it? Officer or employee? Larry consults legal experts to dig into the matter.

    Guests:

    Ilya Shapiro, senior fellow in constitutional studies at the libertarian Cato Institute, which filed an amicus brief in support of the petitioner in this case; editor-in-chief of the Cato Supreme Court Review; he tweets @ishapiro

    Peter Shane, expert in administrative law and separation of powers; law professor at Ohio State University; his book on the separation of powers is "Madison’s Nightmare: How Executive Power Threatens American Democracy" (2009, University of Chicago Press)

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Philadelphia Police Arrest Of Two Black Men In Starbucks, Prompts Apology From Company's CEO

    Protestor Soren Mcclay, 14, (C) demonstrates outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.; Credit: Mark Makela/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Starbucks is closing some 8,000 of its locations in May for implicit bias training, after a store manager in Philadelphia called the cops that led to the arrests of two black men.

    The coffee giant is widely criticized for what happened. This morning, the company’s executive chairman Howard Schultz appeared on CBS This Morning for a sit down with co-host Gayle King. Schultz told King in the interview that the store manager at the center of the controversy has “left the company.”

    “I think you have to say in looking at the tape that she demonstrated her own level of unconscious bias,” Schultz went on to say. “And in looking at the tape, you ask yourself whether or not that was racial profiling.”

    How is implicit bias determined from a human resource standpoint?  

    Guest:

    Sue Bendavid, chair of the employment law department and attorney at Lewitt Hackman in Los Angeles; the firm represents companies and employers

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    2008 Republican National Convention: Day 2

    Former first lady Barbara Bush attends day two of the Republican National Convention (RNC) at the Xcel Energy Center on September 2, 2008 in St. Paul, Minnesota.; Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Barbara Bush, the former US first lady died on Tuesday at the age of 92.

    The cause of her death wasn't immediately known.

    Bush, who passed away after a series of hospitalizations, is known for being a fierce champion of literacy. She was the second woman in American history to have had a husband and a son elected as president, after Abigail Adams.

    Bush once wrote how she “had the best job in America." and in her 1994 memoir, Bush described her days at the White House as “interesting, rewarding and sometimes just plain fun.” We take a look at Bush’s legacy as First Lady, and how the role has evolved through the years.

    Guest:

    Stacy Cordery, first ladies historian, bibliographer for the National First Ladies Library and professor of history at Iowa State University; her latest book is "Juliette Gordon Low: The Remarkable Founder of the Girl Scouts" (Penguin Books, 2013) and she tweets @StacyCordery

    Catherine Allgor, first ladies historian and president of the Massachusetts Historical Society; she is the author of several books, including “Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government” (University of Virginia Press, 2000) and she tweets @CatherineAllgor

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    LAPD Chief Charlie Beck joins AirTalk for his monthly check-in to discuss the new CA bills looking to change police policies regarding use-of-force standards and public access to records related to officer misconduct.; Credit: HECTOR MATA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Caitlin Plummer | AirTalk®

    Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck joins Larry Mantle for his monthly check-in. Topics discussed include:

    • Protocol when officers are called to remove someone from a business, like the incident at the Philadelphia Starbucks
    • The California bill that would change the long-standing definition of when an officer can use deadly force
    • The California bill that would allow the public access to police records regarding investigations into officer misconduct like use-of-force or on-the-job sexual assault
    • D.A. Jackey Lacey’s controversial decision not to bring criminal charges against the LAPD officer who shot Brendon Glenn, after Beck called for him to be prosecuted
    • The LAPD’s policy on muting body cam microphones after the Sacramento shooting
    • A jump in L.A. pedestrian deaths in 2017
    • The increase in hate crimes within the city of L.A. during 2017
    • The ever-present danger of L.A. street races
    • The federal judge ruling preventing the LAPD from enforcing gang injunctions and what the transition has been like – plus, Trump’s criticism that California isn’t doing enough

    Guest:

    Charlie Beck, chief of police of the Los Angeles Police Department; his last day as chief will be June 27, 2018, his 65th birthday

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Senate Lawmakers Speak To The Media After Their Weekly Policy Luncheons

    Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) (C) talks to reporters with Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) (L) and Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) following the weekly Democratic policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol November 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. ; Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    The U.S. Senate unanimously agreed Wednesday to allow senators to bring babies under the age of one onto the Senate floor during votes.

    The move came after Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) submitted a resolution this week that would allow her to vote on the Senate floor even while she is on  an unofficial maternity leave. Senators must be present on the floor in order to cast votes, and cannot vote by proxy like they would on committees.

    Earlier this month, the Illinois Democrat made history when she became the first sitting senator to give birth while in office.

    With guest host Libby Denkmann

    Guests:

    Jennifer Haberkorn, senior health reporter for Politico Pro who has been covering the story; she tweets @jenhab

    Jon Hyman, employment lawyer and author of the Ohio Employer’s Law Blog; he is a partner in the Labor & Employment Group at Cleveland’s Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis; he tweets @jonhyman

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    CUBA-ETHIOPIA-DIPLOMACY-CASTRO-WIRTU

    Cuban President Raul Castro (C) welcomes Ethiopian President Mulatu Teshome Wirtu (R) at the Revolution Palace in Havana, on January 9, 2018.; Credit: ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    For the first time in 60 years, Cuba will be ruled by someone outside of the Castro family.

    The transition of power takes place today. The Cuban government on Wednesday selected 57-year-old First Vice President Miguel Mario Diaz-Canel Bermudez as the sole candidate to succeed President Raul Castro. His approval is all but certain. The move will ensure that the country's single-party system outlasts the aging revolutionaries who created it.

    The 86-year-old Castro will remain head of the Communist Party, designated by the constitution as "the superior guiding force of society and the state." As a result, Castro will remain the most powerful person in Cuba for the time being. His departure from the presidency is nonetheless a symbolically charged moment for a country accustomed to 60 years of absolute rule first by revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and, for the last decade, his younger brother.

    With files from the Associated Press.

     

    With guest host Libby Denkmann

    Guest:

    Will Grant, correspondent for the BBC in Havana, Cuba; he tweets @will_grant

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Scott Wiener YIMBY

    State Sen. Scott Weiner (D-San Francisco) speaks to an attendee at an Abundant Housing LA event. ; Credit: Josie Huang/KPCC

    AirTalk®

    Despite gaining national attention that included a front-page write-up on the New York Times, a housing bill in the California legislature pushing for more dense residential developments around public transit hubs died on Tuesday when it was unable to make it out of committee.

    The Senate Committee on Transportation and Housing shot down SB 827, which AirTalk debated after it was introduced, on the grounds that its approach was too broad and that it treated small cities the same way it treated larger ones like San Francisco. The bill would have removed restrictions on constructing multi-story residential buildings in areas zoned for things like single-family homes within a half-mile of public transit stops.

    San Francisco Senator Scott Wiener, who authored the bill, had hoped providing more units near rail stops would address two of California’s biggest issues – affordable housing and reducing carbon emissions – by encouraging residents to use public transit instead of driving. But the bill ran into opposition from a number of interest groups and elected city officials in places like Los Angeles and San Francisco, who argued it would take neighborhood development control away from local governments.

    Senator Wiener says he plans to bring the bill back in a future legislative session. But what might that bill look like? And how will Senator Wiener address the concerns that his colleagues expressed? What can we expect the state to do about addressing the affordable housing crisis in the meantime?

     

    With guest host Libby Denkmann

    Guests:

    Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), author of SB 827; California State Senator representing Senate District 11, which includes all of the city and county of San Francisco, Broadmoor, Colma, Daly City, and part of South San Francisco; he tweets @Scott_Wiener

    Liam Dillon, reporter covering state politics and policy for the Los Angeles Times; his beat includes housing and he has been following SB 827; he tweets @dillonliam

     

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    San Diego University Student Found Dead In Frat House

    Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity house at San Diego State University. What benefits do fraternities and sororities provide to the students who take part in them?; Credit: Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Earlier this week, Cal Poly State University’s president announced that he was suspending all of Greek life, after the recent emergence of a photo of a student in blackface at a Lambda Chi Alpha party.

    Nearly two months prior, there was a racial profiling and cultural appropriation incident at Cal Poly’s Sigma Nu. In his open letter, Cal Poly president Jeffrey Armstrong says these occurrences have led to the suspension and that details on how Greek life can resume are forthcoming.

    These aren’t the first fraternities to get in trouble for racism. And even after highly publicized incidents and public backlash, it seems that members of frats and sororities continue to get in trouble for their behavior.

    If you are in Greek life, what is your take on these events? What is the value in Greek life? If you are a parent who participated in Greek life, are you encouraging your kids to follow in your footsteps? Why or why not?

    Call us at 866-893-5722.

    With guest host Libby Denkmann

    Guest:

    John Hechinger, author of “True Gentlemen: The Broken Pledge of America’s Fraternities” (2017, PublicAffairs); he is a senior editor at Bloomberg News

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia on Tuesday.

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia on Tuesday.; Credit: /AP

    AirTalk®

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ordered inspections Wednesday on engine fan blades following a fatal explosion on a Southwest Airlines flight.

    The CFM56-7B engine on the 737 Southwest jet blew apart on Tuesday and resulted in the death of a woman who was partially blown out of the window. The passenger, Jennifer Riordan, died of blunt impact trauma to the head, neck and torso, according to Philadelphia’s medical examiner.

    We talk to safety experts to examine why one of the fan blades shot off and what does that mean to future airline safety regulations.

    Guests:

    John Goglia, aviation safety teacher at Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology in New York. He is an independent safety consultant and a former National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) board member; he tweets @crashdetective

    Cem Tasan, professor of metallurgy at the department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    California State Capitol Building

    California State Capitol Building in Sacramento.; Credit: Jeff's Canon/Flickr Creative Commons

    AirTalk®

    Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher (D-San Diego) is trying a novel strategy to allow a woman to testify in support of her bill, despite the woman’s nondisclosure agreement with her past employer.

    The strategy: asking the Assembly to issue a subpoena.

    If Speaker Anthony Rendon grants the subpoena, it could set a new precedent. The process could be used by the Legislature to allow people with forced arbitration agreements to discuss matters they’ve legally agreed to be silent about, which could be a boon to people who’ve faced sexual harassment and discrimination and decide they want to discuss publicly.

    Tara Zoumer, the woman in question, wants to testify in support of AB 3080, a bill introduced by Assemblymember Fletcher that aims to stop employers from barring workers from taking discrimination, labor or harassment claims to court.  

    We get the latest on this story. Plus, we zoom out and look at the status of NDAs in California as they face greater scrutiny in the context of #MeToo.  

    With guest host Libby Denkmann

    Guests:

    Melody Gutierrez, political reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle who’s been following the story; she tweets @MelodyGutierrez

    Orly Lobel, law professor at the University of San Diego School of Law; author of “You Don't Own Me: How Mattel v. MGA Entertainment Exposed Barbie's Dark Side” (2017, W. W. Norton & Company); she tweets @OrlyLobel

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Golden Gate Bridge Security

    The western span of the San Francisco Bay Bridge and San Francisco skyline seen November 2, 2001. ; Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    A new report from the U.S. Geological Survey shows that there’s a more dangerous, though lesser known, fault running through densely populated areas of the East Bay.

    In the event of a magnitude 7 earthquake, nearly 800 people could be killed, with an injury estimate of 18,000.

    What precautions can the region take to avoid a potential disaster? We discuss the new study with its lead author and examine the economic impact of a potential East Bay quake.

    Guests:

    Ken Hudnut, lead author on The HayWired Earthquake Scenario, a study on the
    Hayward fault; geophysicist and science advisor for risk reduction for the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS)

    Anne Wein, co-author of The HayWired Earthquake Scenario study; disaster and resilient analyst, and a principal investigator with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in the Western Geographic Science Center in California

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    Donald Trump Speaks With Russian Leader Vladimir Putin From The White House

    President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office of the White House, January 28, 2017 in Washington, DC. Also pictured, from left, White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Vice President Mike Pence, and White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.; Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    The Democratic National Committee (DNC) filed a lawsuit in the federal district court in Manhattan Friday against Russia, WikiLeaks and the Trump campaign alleging that the three entities conspired to disrupt the 2016 presidential campaign.

    The suit alleges that Trump campaign associates conspired with the Russian government and hacked the Democratic Party’s computer networks, circulating stolen material found there, according to the Washington Post.

    The DNC is seeking millions of dollars in compensation for the alleged damage suffered from the hacks.

    Guests:

    Kyle Cheney, congressional reporter for Politico

    Jack Lerner, law professor and director of the Intellectual Property, Arts, and Technology Clinic at UC Irvine School of Law where his focus includes electronic voting and technology law

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


    0 0

    COLOMBIA-MARIJUANA-PROTEST

    Activist smoke joints during a prostest under the motto "No vamos a pagar, lo vamos a pegar" (something like 'We are not going to pay for it, we are going to get the kick out of it") against the imposing of fines for smoking marijuana by police according to their new code, in Bogota, on August 1, 2017.; Credit: AFP Contributor/AFP/Getty Images

    AirTalk®

    Not coincidentally, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) plans to introduce legislation today to decriminalize marijuana, which is on the list of scheduled substances along with drugs like heroin.

    The bill would let each state decide whether to allow the commercial sale of cannabis, ending the legal grey space that many marijuana businesses find themselves in.

    Various polls show that there is support for legalizing cannabis throughout the U.S. According to a recent CBS News poll, six in ten Americans think it should be legalized. A Pew Research Center poll put the number at 61 percent in favor of legalization, with 70 percent support among millennials.

    What would it take to decriminalize marijuana federally and how would states negotiate their laws with the federal government? And what are the attitudes of Americans towards legalization?

    Guests:

    Frank Newport, editor-in-chief for the Gallup Poll; he tweets @Frank_Newport

    John Schroyer, senior reporter at Marijuana Business Daily

    Jay Wexler, expert in constitutional and cannabis law; professor of law at Boston University

    This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.